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from the 16th to the 19th centuries
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Caricatures
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Caricature of Pitt's new Banknotes.
James Gillray.

London, H.G.Bohn, 1851. Because of the need for gold for foreign trade during the war with the French, William Pitt the younger pressured the Bank of England into temporarily suspending its practice of honouring banknotes with gold. The Bank then issued 1 & 2 notes for the first time. Here Sheridan, Fox and Stanhope, dressed as French revolutionaries, try to persuade John Bull to refuse to accept them. First published 1797.
GILL0008
£250.00

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Satire on Fashion
James Gillray.

London, H.G.Bohn, 1851. Cheapside copying St James's. First published 1794.
GILL0027
£95.00

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Satire on War Loans to Austria
James Gillray.

London, H.G.Bohn, 1851. In 1795 the British Government loaned money to Austria to help pay for the French Revolutionary War. Here John Bull is shown being abused by both friend and foe. The Austrian emperor picks his pocket; a Prussian Death's Head Hussar waves another bag of cash; a Dutchman blows pipe-smoke in Bull's face while a sans-coulotte kicks his backside. The final indignity is the British Prime Minister, Pitt the Younger, shouting encouragement to the tormentors while rifling the pockets of Bull's jacket.
GILL0013
£160.00

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Satire on Lord Howe
James Gillray.

London, H.G.Bohn, 1851. Admiral Howe was much criticised for staying in Torbay instead of blockading the French at Brest. Here Gillray suggests that French money was responsible. Six months later the 'Glorious First of June' sea battle restored Howe's reputation. First published 1793.
GILL0024
£225.00

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Satire on Admiral Howe
James Gillray.

London, H.G.Bohn, 1851. Admiral Howe, known as Black Dick because of his swarthy complexion, was First Lord of the Admiralty 1783-88. Budgetary constraints hampered him, so he is satirised here for his reform of naval uniform rather than more urgent problems First published 1803.
GILL0033
£175.00

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Satire on Ireland
James Gillray.

London, H.G.Bohn, 1851. First published 1805, this is a dim view of Ireland, with run-down taverns and coaches, and starving pigs and horses, only a few years after Ireland was incorporated into the United Kingdom in 1801. The signature bottom left, 'C.Loraine Smith', is meant satirically, with Gillray using the name of a well-known landscape painter.
GILL0038
£95.00

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Caricature of Napoleon as First Consul.
James Gillray.

London, H.G.Bohn, 1851. Having made himself First Consul of France Napoleon's imperial pretentions are being mocked. The apples are the monarchies of Europe, and he regards himslef as an apples, despite being swept from a French dungheap, with 'First Horse Turd' on his hat. First published 1800.
GILL0010
£240.00

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Satire on the Napoleonic War
James Gillray.

London, H.G.Bohn, 1851. Military posturing: Henry Addington and a diminutive Napoleon facing each other defiantly across a narrow channel. First published 1803.
GILL0015
£195.00

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Satire on the Meeting of Napoleon & Charles James Fox
James Gillray.

London, H.G.Bohn, 1851. Having supported the French Revolution, the English politician Charles James Fox withdrew from Parliament when France declared war on England in 1797. After the Peace of Amiens in 1802 he went to Paris to research a history of the 'Glorious Revolution' of 1688 and was invited to a levee at the Tuileries by Napoleon, a meeting satirised here. Unusually Napoleon is treated kindly: it is Fox, his wife and entourage who are being ridiculed. First published 1802.
GILL0016
£180.00

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The first appearence of the 'Little Boney' image.
James Gillray.

London, H.G.Bohn, 1851. Gillray's first cartoon to depict Bonaparte as 'Little Boney', first published 1803. Napoleon is beside himself as the Austrian ambassador passes through Paris without bothering to present himself to court, only a few months before Napoleon made himself emperor. In reality Napoleon ordered the Count, who was en route to London, to leave Paris at short notice.
GILL0017
£160.00

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Satire on the Napoleon's Coup against the Directory
James Gillray.

London, H.G.Bohn, 1851. Napoleon dissolves the Directory by force, an event known as the 'Revolution of the 18th Brumaire'. He became First Consul a month later. First published 1799.
GILL0020
£195.00

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Satire on the Recommencement of War in 1803
James Gillray.

London, H.G.Bohn, 1851. George III holds Napoleon by the neck before throwing him to the hounds, named after his generals and admirals including Nelson and Cornwallis. Prime Minister William Pitt approaches on horseback. Gillray is a little premature: Napoleon wasn't removed from the world's stage until Waterloo, twelve years later. First published 1803.
GILL0032
£180.00

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Satire on Republicanism
James Gillray.

London, H.G.Bohn, 1851. Napoleon, having pruned the monarchies of Europe, helps reformers attack the British Royal Oak. On top of the new tree is Lord Moira, who claimed to be descended from the Irish royal race of Ballynahinch. First published 1807.
GILL0036
£225.00

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Caricature of Emma Hamilton
James Gillray.

London, H.G.Bohn, 1851. After the Battle of the Nile, Nelson recuperated at the home of Sir William Hamiton, a noted antiquary, and Emma, Lady Hamilton, at Naples. Nelson and Emma started a notorious affair, and by the time the three returned to England in November 1800, Emma was seven months pregnant with Nelson?s child. Nelson, promoted to vice-admiral, resumed duty as second-in-command of the Channel Fleet on 17 January 1801. Here Emma watches from the marital bed as Nelson sails off to take his post, leaving her wilth 'the old Antique', her husband in bed behind her. First published 1801.
GILL0011
£250.00

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Palmistry engraving
William Hogarth

London, 1782.
HOGA0002
£195.00

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Satire on the 'Voluntary Contribution'
James Gillray.

London, H.G.Bohn, 1851. Pitt forcing John Bull to hand over a voluntary loan by threatening worse methods. First published 1807.
GILL0037
£195.00

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Satire on Prince William Henry
James Gillray.

London, H.G.Bohn, 1851. Prince William Henry, younger brother of George III, spent some time in Jamaica. First published 1788.
GILL0023
£195.00

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Satire on the Marriage of the Duke of York
James Gillray.

London, H.G.Bohn, 1851. George III's eyes light up at the sight of his Prussian daughter-in-law's dowery. First published 1791.
GILL0028
£150.00

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Satire on the Prince of Wales's Infidelities
James Gillray.

London, H.G.Bohn, 1851. The Prince of Wales in bed with Lady Jersey, discovered by his wife. First published 1796.
GILL0029
£150.00

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Set of Hogarth Harlot's Progress
William Hogarth

London, Baldwin & Cradock, c.1830. Hogarth's famous set, telling the story of a prostitute from her arrival in London, her heyday as a rich man's temperamental mistress to reduced circumstances, prison, illness and death. Two letterpress sheets explain many of the obscure references. A very decorative set.
HOGA0005
£750.00

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